Difference between revisions of "User talk:Phaedrus/Wishes"

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(Praise and questions)
 
(Response to Lloyd Brunnel's question)
 
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This is an enjoyable story but I'm not really sure I understand the part about the blood clot or what the last line means. --[[User:Lloyd Brunnel|Lloyd Brunnel]] 01:29, 31 August 2009 (UTC)
 
This is an enjoyable story but I'm not really sure I understand the part about the blood clot or what the last line means. --[[User:Lloyd Brunnel|Lloyd Brunnel]] 01:29, 31 August 2009 (UTC)
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: You don't understand it because of horrible writing -- thinking that it was really clever to be brief and leave critical details as things to be discovered by implication, when actually the reader doesn't have enough information to discover them.
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: The blood-clot scene: Jason-wolf wishes for future generations of wolves who can understand the world as he does. But how can the genie pull that one off, when the only way to produce a wolf like that is by starting with a human soul with human experiences, and grabbing random human souls out of the afterlife (or random humans off the street) would presumably be uncalled-for? No problem. There are billions of people in the world. At any given moment, thousands and thousands of them are dying. And a very few of them are bound to be people with the same sort of odd wish that Jason had. So just find a few of those dearly-departed-and-species-confused souls and reincarnate them as wolf pups, like Jason himself was reincarnated at the start of the story. Problem solved.
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: The final line: This one is even worse, since it requires the reader to understand the blood-clot scene (which was already incomprehensible). Jason-wolf's original thought for his third wish was to have a long life -- after all, one of the many unromantic aspects of the real lupine lifestyle is that they don't survive very long in the wild. But he decides that this is selfish. So instead he wishes for good things for his pack, and gets on with the rest of his life. Oops, now he's dying. But wait a minute. He wished for his descendants to understand the world as he does... and that's being accomplished by reincarnating former humans. Well, who would possibly be a better candidate for "seeing the world as he does" then he is? He's the perfect match for his own second wish. So he gets reincarnated again, and presumably he'll keep coming back as long as the wishes have power.
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: To summarize the summary of the summary: Writers are a problem. [[User:Phaedrus|Phaedrus]] 01:54, 31 August 2009 (UTC)

Latest revision as of 20:54, 30 August 2009

This is an enjoyable story but I'm not really sure I understand the part about the blood clot or what the last line means. --Lloyd Brunnel 01:29, 31 August 2009 (UTC)

You don't understand it because of horrible writing -- thinking that it was really clever to be brief and leave critical details as things to be discovered by implication, when actually the reader doesn't have enough information to discover them.
The blood-clot scene: Jason-wolf wishes for future generations of wolves who can understand the world as he does. But how can the genie pull that one off, when the only way to produce a wolf like that is by starting with a human soul with human experiences, and grabbing random human souls out of the afterlife (or random humans off the street) would presumably be uncalled-for? No problem. There are billions of people in the world. At any given moment, thousands and thousands of them are dying. And a very few of them are bound to be people with the same sort of odd wish that Jason had. So just find a few of those dearly-departed-and-species-confused souls and reincarnate them as wolf pups, like Jason himself was reincarnated at the start of the story. Problem solved.
The final line: This one is even worse, since it requires the reader to understand the blood-clot scene (which was already incomprehensible). Jason-wolf's original thought for his third wish was to have a long life -- after all, one of the many unromantic aspects of the real lupine lifestyle is that they don't survive very long in the wild. But he decides that this is selfish. So instead he wishes for good things for his pack, and gets on with the rest of his life. Oops, now he's dying. But wait a minute. He wished for his descendants to understand the world as he does... and that's being accomplished by reincarnating former humans. Well, who would possibly be a better candidate for "seeing the world as he does" then he is? He's the perfect match for his own second wish. So he gets reincarnated again, and presumably he'll keep coming back as long as the wishes have power.
To summarize the summary of the summary: Writers are a problem. Phaedrus 01:54, 31 August 2009 (UTC)